Why You Should De Friend Your Ex Friend on Facebook

Quite often the advice one sees for romantic partners can also apply to platonic friends. I think this is another example:

Why You Should Defriend Your Ex on Facebook

Breakups suck. Whether it was a peaceful or crazy split, trying to get over your former man [or platonic friend] will be hard. Want to move on fast? Defriend him [or her] on Facebook.

By Dara Adeeyo

According to a new study from the Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking journal, keeping tabs on your ex’s life online will keep you kinda hooked on him [or her]. In the study, researchers evaluated the Facebook usage, emotional recovery, and personal judgement of 464 participants after they went through a breakup. The results were totally shocking.

Study participants who kept tabs on their exes, felt more upset about their breakup than those who didn’t. Researchers also discovered that Facebook, uh, stalking an ex basically makes you feel as crappy as you would if you were forced to hang with him as “just friends” on a regular basis.

Bottom line: Taking a look at what your ex is up to is just not a good idea if you want to move on.

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Please be sure to read the most important post at this blog:
A Warning About The Friendship Blog – Toxic – Unfriendly Bullied Bullies Trolls Dr Irene S Levine

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Article about Friends Breaking Up with Friends and Advice on How to Do It

Please be sure to read the most important post at this blog:
A Warning About The Friendship Blog – Toxic – Unfriendly Bullied Bullies Trolls


It’s Not Me, It’s You [A page about friendship break ups, from The New York Times]

If you would like to read the whole page, please click on that link.

Comments left by visitors to the page, which appear at the bottom of it, are also illuminating.

I see some of the same bitterness there by women that I saw at Dr. Irene’s “Friendship Blog.” Some women cannot handle or accept that a friend has broken up with them, or that friendship break ups are a part of life, so they become very bitter, angry people.

Here are a few high lights from the page:

    by Alex Williams
    January 28, 2012

    ….Not so in the real world. Even though research shows that it is natural, and perhaps inevitable, for people to prune the weeds from their social groups as they move through adulthood, those who actually attempt to defriend in real life find that it often plays out like a divorce in miniature — a tangle of awkward exchanges, made-up excuses, hurt feelings and lingering ill will.

    ….People start “dropping ‘starter friends’ from the early bachelor days, or early work associates, or early couples with little children like yours,” said Mr. Horchow, who wrote “The Art of Friendship: 70 Simple Rules for Making Meaningful Connections”…

    Psychologists consider it an inevitable life stage, a point where people achieve enough maturity and self-awareness to know who they are and what they want out of their remaining years, and have a degree of clarity about which friends deserve full attention and which are a drain. It is time, in other words, to shed people they collected in their youth, when they were still trying on friends for size.
    (more…)